Miso-Ginger Cabbage Salad

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Anyone who’s seen Forks over Knives or generally wants to eat healthier knows they should eat more veggies, and especially raw veggies. Yet, somehow a lot of us never do. Don’t worry, though, team – I have the answer, and it’s not something awful like getting up extra early or only snacking on plain broccoli stalks like an angry Brontosaurus.

The trick to eating more salads and raw veggies is super simple – find a good recipe and make them ahead of time. Yeah, that’s right. Get off your hungover ass on Sunday and prepare a big-ass salad that will last you several meals (I don’t even drink, and this still applies to me. Why do weekend days go by so much faster than weekdays? Physicists should look into this). Unless you’re a freaking saint, there’s just no way that you’re going to do it at 7 am on a Monday so that you can have a fresh, nutritious lunch.

I’m human, after all. When given the choice between an extra fifteen minutes in my warm bed and fifteen minutes chopping, grating and peeling while my brain hasn’t even woken up yet, I’ll pretty much always choose the warm bed. If you’re one of the insanely disciplined people who thinks raisins are junk food and meditates for two hours before work every day, then feel free to ignore all of this and continue making all of us feel inadequate. If you’re more like me, though, suck it up and do it ahead of time.
 If it’s already made, I’ll happily chow down on a raw salad for lunch and/or dinner because I do actually like big-ass salads. This is no punishment – they’re tasty, fresh, filling, and I know I’m putting something nutritious in my body. I’m not talking iceberg lettuce and cucumber, because NO ONE can survive on that. I’m talking beans, seeds, nuts, a variety of veggies, and a sauce so good it makes your toes curl. But no matter how much I like them, when I’m starving and I stagger home from work, all I want to do is tear off my f-ing stockings (or whatever, you get the idea), put on sweat pants, and eat insane quantities of food until I’ve forgotten that I’m a pseudo-adult. And no matter what bullshit popular culture tells you, carrots and kale are capable of doing that, just as long as they taste super-delish in their sauce and all you have to do is scoop them into a bowl. Even the fork is optional, if you’re feeling particularly caveman today.
So, without further ado, here is yet another salad recipe that makes enough for several days of raw veggie food-bingeing (or delicate, conscious eating, if that’s your jam). Make it tonight (I promise, Netflix will still be there in half an hour), and reap the benefits all week. You’ve been told, son. 
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This salad is so good that I legitimately ate it for breakfast twice last week. I was at work both times, so that should keep the old cooler-chats going (I’m not 100, and there’s no cooler at my work, I just couldn’t resist). So far no one who’s had it hasn’t loved it, and if you made it through the double negative in this sentence you’ll have no problem making this because it’s easy peasy.
Since it’s 11:30 and I have work tomorrow, I’m going to cut to the relevant deets and let the flavour of this one speak for itself.
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Ingredients:
– A lot of cabbage, sliced thinly (about one medium/small sized cabbage, or half a big-ass one)
– 3 ish cups quinoa, cooked (1.5 cups uncooked + 3 cups water is what I used)
– 3 cups grated carrot (or 2 if you’re not super into carrots, although that’s just crazy)
– 5 tbsp sesame oil
– 2 tbsp Shiro miso
– 1/4 cup rice vinegar + more as needed
– 2 tbsp Bragg’s liquid aminos
– 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
– 1 piece of ginger, about 2″, peeled and finely chopped
– 2 tbsp agave syrup
– a few tbsp sesame seeds (optional)
Shred the carrot, chop the cabbage, and cook the quinoa.
In a blender, mix up all the remaining ingredients and pour it over the veggies.
Once the quinoa has cooled, mix it in with everything else and top with sesame seeds. Don’t get creative on this part, because if the quinoa is still warm the cabbage and carrot will release water and you’ll have a soupy, not-very-delicious mess, which would be awful because done properly this salad can catapult you to new levels of plant-based bliss.
And….that’s it. ‘Night!
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Miso-Ginger Cabbage Salad
 
Prep time
Total time
 
One of my all-time-favourite salad recipes. This one can make anyone love cabbage AND miso - it's a miracle!
Author:
Recipe type: Salad
Cuisine: Vegan
Serves: 8-10 servings
Ingredients
  • Ingredients:
  • - A lot of cabbage, sliced thinly (about one medium/small sized cabbage, or half a big-ass one)
  • - 3 ish cups quinoa, cooked (1.5 cups uncooked + 3 cups water is what I used)
  • - 3 cups grated carrot (or 2 if you're not super into carrots, although that's just crazy)
  • - 5 tbsp sesame oil
  • - 2 tbsp Shiro miso
  • - ¼ cup rice vinegar + more as needed
  • - 2 tbsp Bragg's liquid aminos
  • - 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • - 1 piece of ginger, about 2", peeled and finely chopped
  • - 2 tbsp agave syrup
  • - a few tbsp sesame seeds (optional)
Instructions
  1. Shred the carrot, chop the cabbage, and cook the quinoa.
  2. In a blender, mix up all the remaining ingredients and pour it over the veggies.
  3. Once the quinoa has cooled, mix it in with everything else and top with sesame seeds. Don't get creative on this part, because if the quinoa is still warm the cabbage and carrot will release water and you'll have a soupy, not-very-delicious mess, which would be awful because done properly this salad can catapult you to new levels of plant-based bliss.

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Comments

    • veganiva says

      There isn’t really a substitute for miso – you could use tahini to get the right texture, but the flavour of the sauce will be somewhat different. I would bump up the Bragg’s a little bit and use tahini. Hopefully it will be different but just as good 🙂

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